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harrywaldron

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 33 total)
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  • in reply to: CGL topics from International Institute for Learning Blog #9728
    harrywaldronharrywaldron
    Participant

    From IIL blog — PMP EXAM changes for 2020 will be implemented on 12/16/2019

    The Project Management Professional (PMP) designation is a prestigious designation for Project Managers. For 2020, the PMP exams have been revised to keep up with new technological & managerial practices. There is even now a focus on people, where best practices include team building using grateful leadership principles.

    https://blog.iil.com/pmp-exam-change-2019/

    1. When is the PMP Exam changing?December 16, 2019

    2. Why is the PMP Exam changing?As a result of redoing the Role Delineation Study (RDS), PMI identified significant changes and trends in our profession that are not addressed in the current PMP Exam

    3. What is changing in the new PMP Exam?will focus on the three NEW domains of: (1) People, (2) Process (PMBOK), and (3) Business Environment.

    4. How do I prepare for the new PMP Exam? Study a minimum of three publications. They are: (1) The new PMP Exam Content Outline, (2) The PMBOK Guide – Sixth Edition, (3) The Agile Practice Guide

    • This reply was modified 11 months, 2 weeks ago by harrywaldronharrywaldron.
    • This reply was modified 11 months, 2 weeks ago by harrywaldronharrywaldron.
    in reply to: The great experience of being a Certified Instructor in GL #9684
    harrywaldronharrywaldron
    Participant

    Thank you for sharing … it is a difficult transition to change from traditional management process to a more “people based” leadership style.  And this type of training changes & makes a difference 1 person at a time 🙂

    harrywaldronharrywaldron
    Participant

    From IIL blogThis excellent article shares 5 leadership major pitfalls to avoid
    https://blog.iil.com/the-5-donts-of-project-management/

    I have seen some major “do nots” throughout a 27-year career in project management and it is only in hindsight that these became my lessons for the future.

    1. Don’t get stuck in the weeds (too much detail or micro-managing)
    2. Don’t take a short corner route for your own gain (do best for your company & team overall)
    3. Don’t keep problems to yourself (get help on very difficult issues)
    4. Don’t be afraid to challenge those around you (stretch team members & inspire them to grow)
    5. Don’t hide behind your desk (manage by “walking around” & encourage team

    harrywaldronharrywaldron
    Participant

    From IIL Blogs — This excellent article from the IIL blogs shares an excellent Q&A series on “leading with Joy” as you work with employees, customers, vendors, and other stakeholders of the organization.  “Leading with Joy” uses a theme of a positive attitude, acknowledgment of others, and grateful leadership principals.  It is applicable to business, IT, or any other management approach 🙂

    https://blog.iil.com/rich-sheridan-on-leading-with-joy/

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 1 month ago by harrywaldronharrywaldron.
    harrywaldronharrywaldron
    Participant

    From IIL blog — This excellent article shares the value of simplification to improve communication, focus, and cost savings.  This is a great concept for grateful leadership & project management needs

    https://blog.iil.com/lisa-bodell-on-simplification-and-innovation/

    Should it always be so simple? What if the situation is really complex?  It should be as simple AS POSSIBLE. We use an acronym called M-U-R-A:

    1. Minimal – Making something as minimal as possible is the one part of the definition everyone always knows. You can get more value from your company or employees by being more focused, more nimble. If we can get in the mindset that less equals value, that’s the very first step. But this is where most people stop; there is more to simplicity than just minimizing.

    2. Understandable – Another element of simplification is to ensure something is as understandable as possible. This is about clarity — no acronyms, no jargon, no big words to sound important. Being ‘understandable’ means getting to the heart of what you mean quickly.

    3. Repeatable – Next: simplicity involves being as repeatable as possible. This is about effectiveness through consistency — avoiding one-off efforts or customizing everything you do. We want to avoid reinventing the wheel each time we do something –this helps us save time, share learning, and ensure we’re repeating best practices.

    4. Accessible – Finally, simplicity is about making things as accessible AS POSSIBLE. This involves being more transparent and open to a wider audience to accomplish more things in an easier way

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 2 months ago by harrywaldronharrywaldron.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 2 months ago by harrywaldronharrywaldron.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 2 months ago by harrywaldronharrywaldron.
    in reply to: Unexpected acknowledgment from an unexpected source. #9495
    harrywaldronharrywaldron
    Participant

    Thank you for sharing how positive feedback & acknowledgment can be beneficial — even in the case of highly regulatory disciplines.  I believe describing what is “working well” motivates others to best practices — just as well as fines or write-ups of findings.  And certainly pointing out & correcting weaknesses are critical for human safety.  Looking out for one another — even from physical standpoint are part of what grateful leadership is all about 🙂

    in reply to: Podcast 102 – TIME #9491
    harrywaldronharrywaldron
    Participant

    Tom – Thanks for the excellent review 🙂 … yes, the principles 0f Grateful Leadership apply to all age groups & are a life long challenge in meeting those best practices of excellence toward one another … and as someone shared with me, TIME is indeed one of most valuable gifts to use wisely

    harrywaldronharrywaldron
    Participant

    Tom – thanks for sharing 🙂 … Judy wrote the two reference manuals for us – sharing best practices in human leadership & teamwork … the podcasts are weekly “real world” examples of how following these high standards make a difference both to us & others in our daily conduct of life.

    At one point, I had all of them downloaded so I can load to MP3 player — and I need to catch up some now that we are nearing the 100 milestone 🙂

    in reply to: CGL topics from International Institute for Learning Blog #9371
    harrywaldronharrywaldron
    Participant

    From IIL blogs – There are some indirect concepts of grateful leadership found in latest IIL blog article — as one must do MORE than satisfy the customer & it sometimes requires grateful leadership concepts in getting team highly motivated & all parties partnering & working in harmony together 🙂

    https://blog.iil.com/customer-satisfaction-is-a-myth/

    QUOTE – Of course, there are those who are willing to accept a “satisfactory” experience if the price is low enough. That’s why, despite all the whining and complaining people do regarding air travel, for example, discount airlines make tons of money packing planes to the gills. Heck, even the major airlines offer “cheap seats” if you’re willing to cram yourself into a small seat, sit way in the back, and have to pay for a beverage.

    Over the years I’ve noticed that clients really don’t want to be “satisfied.” Why? Because achieving satisfaction is just meeting the requirements. And even though that’s the traditional definition of quality, it’s a pretty low bar these days. Clients want to be wowed, delighted, or even astonished. They want, and expect, us to go above and beyond given the level of investment in, and the importance of, their projects.

    in reply to: CGL topics from International Institute for Learning Blog #9365
    harrywaldronharrywaldron
    Participant

    From IIL Blogs — This excellent article from the IIL blogs shares how positive change start from role models & culture established by the leaders themselves

    https://blog.iil.com/rich-sheridan-change-begins-with-you/

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by harrywaldronharrywaldron.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by harrywaldronharrywaldron.
    in reply to: Introduction #9337
    harrywaldronharrywaldron
    Participant

    Dear Rich – we welcome you to Center for Grateful Leadership 🙂  Being in IT field myself, I enjoyed the article recently published by IIL & sharing a copy below.  It embodies CGL concepts & many best practices of past leadership teachers

    This excellent article from the IIL blogs shares how positive change start from role models & culture established by the leaders themselves

    https://blog.iil.com/rich-sheridan-change-begins-with-you/

     

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by harrywaldronharrywaldron.
    in reply to: THANKSGIVING – celebrate with gratitude #9187
    harrywaldronharrywaldron
    Participant

    in reply to: Center for Grateful Leadership – BEST PRACTICES #9179
    harrywaldronharrywaldron
    Participant

    YouTube is excellent resource for free training for virtually any topic.  A wealth of material resides there to learn visually as well.  A search of GRATEFUL LEADERSHIP will share many valuable CGL resources as well

    https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=grateful+leadership

    in reply to: CGL MONTHLY MEETINGS – 2018 schedule #9178
    harrywaldronharrywaldron
    Participant

    November 16, 2018 1:00 pm ET — REACH NEW HEIGHTS IN GRATEFUL LEADERSHIP

    On Friday, November 16th at 1:00 pm ET, we will have a live webinar with members of the Center for Grateful Leadership (CGL) and special guest presenter Alan Mallory, BSc, PEng, PE, PMP, who is also a Keynote presenter for IPMDay 2018! Come to hear about Alan’s great and inspiring topic for CGL members: “Reaching New Heights in Grateful Leadership.”

    Climbing Mount Everest is considered one of the greatest feats a human being can achieve. Learn how Alan Mallory and his family were successful in reaching the summit by applying the principles of positive focus, empowering team members, building relationships, acknowledging each other’s strengths, and working together to manifest a courageous and ambitious goal. We will show some short video clips from his IPMDay presentation.

    Please join us online through link below:

    https://iil.adobeconnect.com/cglnovemberwebinar/

    Select the “Enter as a guest” option & enter password: grateful

    in reply to: Introduce Yourself! #9145
    harrywaldronharrywaldron
    Participant

    Thank you for joining our CGL community & training center 🙂

    We welcome you to our forums & encourage ALL to take time & listen to the highly motivating podcast library

    And another great benefit is to attend our FREE monthly one-hour training program  (Meeting dates/times are published in thread at top of forums).

    These discussion forums are a great resource for ideas or questions.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 33 total)
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